Dating apps – Rencontre Latina http://rencontre-latina.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 12:31:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rencontre-latina.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/cropped-icon-32x32.png Dating apps – Rencontre Latina http://rencontre-latina.com/ 32 32 Why online ways to find ‘love’ are losing ‘interest’ for Gen Z https://rencontre-latina.com/why-online-ways-to-find-love-are-losing-interest-for-gen-z/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 13:51:08 +0000 https://rencontre-latina.com/why-online-ways-to-find-love-are-losing-interest-for-gen-z/ While it’s easy to find “love” online, apps have lost their luster in Gen Z. |

A couple who met through “dating apps” need not stay in a healthy, long-term relationship. In a recent case, a “virtual” relationship between Mumbai food blogger Aaftab Amin Poonawala and aspiring journalist Shraddha Walker ended horribly when the boy killed and cut the girl’s body into 35 pieces before broadcast them in a Delhi forest.

But, as dating apps are easy and popular ways to connect and find “love”, and thanks to these features, they have sparked “interest” in India. Gen Z and Millennials rely heavily on these apps to find their partners. However, experts have spoken out against finding your interest “virtually”.

No guarantee that the other side of the individual has a clear picture

Because there is no guarantee that the other side of the individual has a clear picture, and the application has no way to cross-check the individual, But, as it takes less time, is full of options and is easily accessible, the dating app market in India remains open. Meanwhile, some dating app relationships succeed while others fail miserably.

This isn’t the first time that online dating apps have come under scrutiny. Tinder Swindler, a gripping Netflix documentary released earlier this year, shed light on the dark side of online dating. Unlike the heinous incident involving Aaftab, this scammer was only interested in the money.

Dating apps have already lost interest in the west

In the West, however, the situation is diametrically opposite. According to a recent media report published on “Timeout.com”, dating apps have struggled since their inception in London.

It is very easy to connect with people using these apps. It’s not unlike using a social media platform. Anyone who wants to use these apps can do so very easily. Yet Generation Z has certainly lost interest in using these apps and is now willing to connect people more “actually” than “literally”, and they are enjoying it.

Why dating apps are entering their flop era

Despite the fact that 74% of Gen Z and Millennials use dating apps, it’s safe to say we’re sick of it. According to a study by Tylt, 84% of millennials prefer to find love “in real life” rather than online. The portal reveals the London dating scene in a nutshell, and here are some of the answers: tough, brutal, unpredictable, messy, mined, and even a cesspool.

How apps are rotting our brains

Apps haven’t just made people fickle, lazier, and harder to find a date; they are also obviously bad for us. They damage our perception of others and mess with our brains by effectively encouraging us to “catalog shop for humans”, as McNeil Love puts it.

No matter how “liberating” dating apps can be, they also cause a significant amount of “suffering” for users.

The apps also “subject the mystery of romantic alchemy to data science work,” so instead of going home to the pretty person we met at a bar, we now have stale dates with people. that a scientific algorithm has chosen for us, based on our own bad judgment.

Back to retro

According to data from Eventbrite, face-to-face dating events have grown 400% over the past four years. While the thought of having a forced conversation with 30 strangers while others watch might make you want to crawl into a black hole and shrivel up, there are people trying to liven up the scene. London has given birth to a new breed of modern, inclusive and enjoyable speed dating.

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Is it profitable for dating apps to assign female leads? https://rencontre-latina.com/is-it-profitable-for-dating-apps-to-assign-female-leads/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 18:09:32 +0000 https://rencontre-latina.com/is-it-profitable-for-dating-apps-to-assign-female-leads/

From Tinder to Bumble, women seem to play a very important role as leaders of dating apps.

The online dating industry has noted that people have been joining these dating apps in droves over the past few years, and the crowd is mostly made up of women. This factor could contribute to one of the reasons why dating apps award women the highest positions.

Powerful women leading dating apps

Until last year, the two most influential dating apps, Tinder and Bumble, were both run by strong women. While Whitney Wolfe Herd is currently CEO of Bumble, Tinder was run by Renate Nyborg until August 2, 2022.

Research has suggested condescending and sexist coverage has been made regarding female leaders, and they have been repeatedly portrayed as “feminist revenge” “young tycoon” and “sexy poster child” On the Internet.

There seems to be some serious tension between the portrayal of women as leaders in the tech world versus how those women behave in their personal and social lives. The two female CEOs of the online dating world, Whitney Wolfe Herd and Renate Nyborg, are the target of media sensationalism.

Controversy over Bumble CEO Whitney Wolfe Herd

The media often associates Whitney Wolfe Herd, the current CEO of the phenomenal dating app Bumble, with her sordid past with Tinder.

Whitney Wolfe Herd, current CEO of Bumble

She took time off from Tinder, claiming she had been sexually assaulted by one of her coworkers, and instead of taking action, she was forced to step down as VP of Marketing at Tinder.

With the help of Russian billionaire Andrey Andreev, Whitney launched Bumble in 2014 as a competitive dating app that provides a safer space for women.

In fact, Bumble differs from Tinder in that it allows women to make the first move.

Whitney Wolfe Herd is also the youngest female CEO and billionaire to lead a public company in the United States.

In an interview, Whitney Wolfe Herd said: “If you’re trying to get to that next step, don’t focus on the short term. Stay married to the long term vision.


Read also : ResearchED: How Desi Dating Apps Boosted India’s Young Romance Scene


Renate Nyborg as CEO of Tinder

Renate Nyborg, former CEO of Tinder

Renate Nyborg became a role model for Tinder users after finding her husband on the app. She is celebrated as the first female CEO of Tinder, and an article in Fortune Magazine calls him “The ultimate testament to Tinder’s ability to create healthy, long-lasting relationships.”

Under his chairmanship, Tinder won several awards, including the Best CEO for Diversity award, and it was ranked as one of the most innovative companies by fast business in 2022.

However, she was fired from her position within a year on August 2, 2022, and her brief stint with Tinder was a hotly debated topic in the news, although the reasons for her departure were unclear. by the company.

“I have loved every moment of the past two years, working with an INCREDIBLE team on the magic of human connection”, Nyborg mentioned in a LinkedIn post.

Fashion as a strategy

Fashion definitely plays a major role in showcasing the strength and leadership qualities of both genders. It’s a calculated decision – how a woman’s sense of style is associated with her power and position in high-tech companies.

In The nation, journalist Alexis Grenell says, “If we don’t notice how women are redefining what executive power looks like, it will remain de facto male.”

Dating apps have a high engagement rate with women at the top.

Let us know your thoughts in the comments section below.

Disclaimer: This article is fact-checked


Picture credits: Google Photos

Feature image designed by Saudamini Seth

Source: Thread, The footprint & CNN

Find the blogger: @ekparna_p

This post is tagged under: dating, online dating, dating apps, india dating apps, tinder, bumble, online dating sites, casual dating, hookup culture, casual dates, long term relationships, marriage via dating apps, matchmaking platforms, romance in india, romance, swipes, swipe right, dating, chat, swipe left, rejection, Renate Nyborg, Whitney Wolfe Herd, feminism, female leaders, CEO, businesswoman, feminist, sexism, sexual harassment, strength, controversy

Disclaimer: We do not hold any rights, copyrights to the images used, these were taken from Google. In case of credit or removal, the owner can send us an email.


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Dating apps have made women too picky for the wrong reasons https://rencontre-latina.com/dating-apps-have-made-women-too-picky-for-the-wrong-reasons/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://rencontre-latina.com/dating-apps-have-made-women-too-picky-for-the-wrong-reasons/

But what if we search for a potential partner on dating apps and we keep running out of time? Millions of people use dating apps in the United States, but we just can’t find Mr. Right no matter how many apps we download and how many guys we swipe on. Unfortunately, the approach we take to using apps to find potential boyfriends or even husbands has now trickled down to the way we approach all aspects of dating, often with negative consequences. . The truth is, dating apps have made women too picky for all the wrong reasons.

How dating has evolved with modernity

If you’re young, single, and feel like you’re not meeting anyone, you inevitably download a dating app. For many, it’s not a question of if, but when.

It’s really hard to be authentic online, and if it’s true for you, it’s also true for others. Think about it. We can swipe left on a guy because he seems bland and boring, but if we met him in a social situation away from the ambiguity of the internet, would we feel differently?

Women are critical creatures, and this brave new world of dating has only exacerbated that trait. When we meet someone in person, it’s very easy to be specific about what we liked and disliked about them. Maybe they made an offhand comment that was offensive, or they drank too much, or they were rude to our friends. On a dating app, this ability to discern is almost non-existent, so we resort to other means to evaluate them: weird hair, hints of jerking, creepy smile, etc., etc.

Women spend more time on profiles they find unattractive than on ones they find attractive.

Since the beginning of civilization, women have been the primary mate selectors and sexual initiators. It was effective when it came to choosing from a group of Neanderthals, but now that mate selection has moved almost entirely online, this ability to choose is colored by clumsiness, inaccuracy and lack of Internet integrity.

So he’s not 6 feet tall

You may have thought about certain characteristics of your ideal guy when you first came to Tinder or Hinge, for example. But over time, swipe after swipe, day after day without success, you might find yourself swiping to the right less and less. Our mind makes a rapid mental catalog of attributes when confronted with a few photos and often poorly written blurbs about the identity of a complete stranger. The photos alone might be enough to turn us off completely: too short. Too old. Too much facial hair. Weird teeth. Why are there girls in all these photos?

The psychology of what makes us swipe left or right is quite fascinating, as you can imagine. It’s surprising, but a study found that both men and women spend more time on profiles they find unattractive and end up swiping left than on profiles they find attractive. In particular, women spend an average of nearly 7 seconds on unattractive profiles, compared to 3.19 seconds on profiles they like and end up swiping right on them. The theory behind this, says researcher Jon Levy of the Kellogg School of Management, is often “a desire for more information.” Or, deep down, what makes this person so unattractive to me?

Men and women approach these situations differently. Women tend to be more picky about profiles they find confusing, while it takes little to no time for men to identify exactly what they find attractive or not in a profile.

Dating apps operate more or less on snap judgments based solely on physical appearance, and being attracted to someone is a crucial and often underestimated part of a romantic pursuit. But do the arbitrary attributes we have come to prefer now dictate all of our decision-making?

What do you bring to the table?

The running joke is that unnecessarily picky women will only date men who are “6ft tall, six figures and have a six-pack” and dump the other poor schlubs for not meeting this presumably insane criteria. . If you judge your online dating pool by factors such as size, education, or income, and other hyper-specific or particular factors, do you also meet those same standards?

If we hold others to high standards, it’s only right that we hold them too.

If we hold others to high standards, it’s only right that we hold them too. It doesn’t make much sense to demand that potential partners meet XYZ and not put effort into those areas of our own lives. We might think that because of dating apps – where it’s possible to meet any guy of any age, anywhere in the country – we have limitless options, but if we bring a sense of unearned entitlement at these approaches, our pool will shrink significantly. . If we find something wrong with every potential match, the pool could completely empty.

It’s important to have expectations, and everyone on a dating app has standards. Topics such as individual values, politics, religion or faith, and the importance of family are just a few examples of characteristics you wouldn’t budge on when it comes to a potential boyfriend. However, there is a distinct difference between non-negotiables and criteria that are not absolutely integral to the fundamental attraction and quality of a relationship. Just because he can take a bad photo here and there or only posts photos of himself on a hike doesn’t mean he’s a bad match for you.

Final Thoughts

We are spoiled for choice these days when it comes to potential ways to meet dates and boyfriends. We might even think that our own weird set of rules is protecting us from a bad guy, when in reality it might be keeping us from having a good thing (potentially even our husband). If there’s ever an opportunity to step out of your comfort zone and try your luck — especially when the stakes are considerably lower than an in-person meeting — it’s on a dating app. The worst they could do is not flirt with you, and then you’ll know for sure that the mutual attraction isn’t there. But otherwise, you might be surprised at what you find.

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Why online dating apps are a big scam https://rencontre-latina.com/why-online-dating-apps-are-a-big-scam/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://rencontre-latina.com/why-online-dating-apps-are-a-big-scam/

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Online dating might sound like fun, but there’s no guarantee of real love (Photo: iStock)

Long term relationships are a function of time, work, patience and commitment. Any relationship based on love should not be instant because, as they say, love grows. On the contrary, dating apps and dating today have made relationships instant – like coffee. And in the short term.

One Saturday afternoon, I am in the village under a tree watching my son and his cousins ​​play. I’m back at my dad’s compound for yet another December vacation after several boring dates in town. I clearly felt I had to give online dating a try after a friend told me that the boyfriend she found on Tinder was a wonderful human.

I quickly download Tinder and create an attractive profile. Do a few swipes on male profiles to find a match; I hear you pick a number and then (delete) one by one until you finally “settle” on “the one”. Seven minutes inside the Tinder house and a character is already asking if we could swap nudes! For example, my profile is only seven minutes long; brother, naked?

Another is here to ask if we could Netflix and Chill. I’m tired and I just decide, okay, I’m staying here to watch how people manage to stay sane in this Tinder world of weird characters. Responding “hey” to all the boring and exciting “hey beautiful” messages from strangers, swiping to check their profiles and photos, fake or not.

Finding the right dating site and a genuine person for a relationship is almost as difficult as the dating itself. Old school humans like me find it more appealing when things happen in real time, in the real world. Suppose I meet a random man on the streets, in a restaurant or even a pub, in a queue at a supermarket or a bank. In this case, she’s a person I’ve seen and making the decision to respond to her “hi” is based on the fact that I did find her attractive, everything else remaining constant.

For example, if you walk into a party or room and cast your eyes over the occupants of the room or the party attendees, there are those you would find attractive. Two or three. Or just one. By making a detailed observation of these two attractive people, you will limit yourself to the one you think is approachable.

It doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with how they look, what they do or like. It could be a character issue – something you quickly noticed about them, personality and all. The real little things Tinder can’t show.

Online, Tinder, let’s say, you must have the best. Fake it until you get it. Everyone on the app does their best to grab attention. And in most cases, that best foot is not an honest foot. Filtered fake photos or old ones from their youth lie about personality and character. A 5.2 could even pass for a 6.2. Fake lifestyles and unrealistic standards. Well, those few are real, but still very rare information about someone you can connect with, for dating.

You keep auditioning for complete strangers in hopes of finding love for a happily ever after life. It’s like gambling. Look for the most basic attributes that you find attractive (which could still be as fake as possible), then go out and meet. Three minutes into the realtime date and you already know this thing will never work. This cannot, will not work! But you agree to play and be polite and pleasant, smile shyly and laugh at their very dry jokes throughout a date.

So here I am thinking of those people who use these dating apps to look for serious love. life partners. Wedding. Because statistics show that an average person has three dating apps on their phone. Now let’s say we have 5 potentials out of three Apps. Tinder. OK Cupid. Afrointroductions. You meet all these 15 strangers, or 10 of them, say, two months and none of them are good enough. Nothing clicks. You dated an entire village of strangers and risked being murdered and robbed, all in the name of finding love.

Waste of time and money hanging out with a group of people you just met in person at a party or at a matatu, local bar or in the elevator. Deciding to meet a 42 year old based on an old photo when they were 32, young and luscious is quite interesting. Old school is sexy. See someone and like them, then decide if you want to meet them on a date. Blind dating and online are for the lazy and the coward.

If the worst becomes the worst and we don’t have the time and the chance to meet and date the people we want, then social media is even better. Facebook and Twitter. Because here you can read their tweets, Facebook posts and comments on several hot topics. A like or a simple comment can go further than just reading a short, fake biography of someone who just wants to get laid.

Related Topics

]]> Bumble to Tinder, how the world sees powerful women leading dating apps https://rencontre-latina.com/bumble-to-tinder-how-the-world-sees-powerful-women-leading-dating-apps/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 06:59:48 +0000 https://rencontre-latina.com/bumble-to-tinder-how-the-world-sees-powerful-women-leading-dating-apps/

People are swiping on dating apps in record numbers and about half of those people identify as female, which may be why the dating app industry has recently given top leadership roles to women. .

Indeed, last year the world’s most powerful dating apps – Bumble and Tinder – were both run by women. Whitney Wolfe Herd is at Bumble while Renate Nyborg ran Tinder.

As researchers who write about dating apps like Bumble and dating and feminism, we were interested to see how journalists reported on these two women leading the highly lucrative, internet-dominated online dating industry. men and we wanted to compare this coverage with how CEOs portray themselves on social media.

We looked at the top 50 news from the last year for every woman who appeared in the search results. We found a sexist and condescending cover pattern. We’ve picked up often-repeated descriptors for female leaders and created three categories to describe them: ‘young mogul’, ‘feminist revenge’ and ‘sexy poster’.

We also did a Google Image search and looked at the top 100 results for each CEO to see how a Google search represented those leaders. What we’ve seen are visually distinct styles closely tied to each brand.

In contrast, we observed more diverse and interesting narratives about gender and leadership in women’s personal media spaces. These stories include notions of motherhood, inclusiveness and equity.

There appear to be significant tensions between new representations of women leaders in tech and how they represent themselves.

The Bumble Feeling

Both CEOs are portrayed in the news through the prism of sexism and sensationalism. In the case of Whitney Wolfe Herd, her youth and her scandalous past with Tinder are often highlighted.

Wolfe Herd launched feminist dating app Bumble in 2014, after quitting Tinder. She became the youngest self-made billionaire woman. She is also the youngest female CEO to take a company public in the United States.

Yet mainstream media and pop culture outlets focus on her controversial past with Tinder and the sex discrimination lawsuit she filed before quitting Tinder.

The language of competition, division and feminist reaction runs through many of these articles. Bumble is framed as part of its larger feminist agenda which seeks revenge on the tech brothers who dominate the dating app industry.

Renate Nyborg lets go on Tinder

Renate Nyborg’s rise to the top of Tinder in 2021 has been making headlines mostly in financial and business publications. Most stories point to her being Tinder’s first female CEO and being a “poster” for the company since meeting her husband on the app. An article in Fortune the magazine calls it “the ultimate testament to Tinder’s ability to create healthy, long-lasting relationships.”

Other stories reflect optimism about Nyborg’s potential to grow the app due to previous startup experience. Tinder positions itself as the brand, and most stories focus on Nyborg’s ability to drive the business forward.

Yet after less than a year, she was quietly released from her post in August and the impact of her brief reign in the tech industry was glossed over.

During her tenure, Tinder won numerous awards, including Best CEO for Diversity, and she was named one of the Most Innovative Companies of 2022 by fast company.

Given the importance of diversity and innovation in the tech industry, his dismissal is curious whether growth in these areas was a priority for the company. This may be related to the illusory nature of empowerment in various aspects of the dating app industry and Tinder’s lingering identity as a platform associated with hookups and misogyny.

Representations on social networks

Compared to limited and problematic portrayals of CEOs in the media, women are using more diverse and personalized notions of gender and leadership on their social media platforms.

Wolfe Herd showcases his identity as CEO of Bumble on his social media accounts, on Instagram in particular and Twitter less so. She also points to her role as a mother who runs a business that is central to her broader feminist mission.

Her narrative of female empowerment reminiscent of the “boss daughter” is widespread. It is built like the brand, with Bumble and its Philosophy “women take the first step” part of a larger feminist mission to revolutionize modern seduction.

Nyborg curates her leadership persona primarily on professional platforms like Twitter and LinkedIn, and actively posts about leadership, tech blogging, and gender diversity. She also highlights her enthusiasm for running the business.

His social media accounts emphasize a broad framework of inclusivity to effect change. On her last day at Tinder, Nyborg shared a post on LinkedIn to highlight her accomplishments, focusing on improving the safety and inclusion of women at her former company.

fashion and color

Fashion and color are used strategically both in the stories and also in the way these women portray themselves as powerful female executives in important leadership roles.

Journalist Alexis Grenell, writing in The nation, suggests that we have been conditioned to visually associate executive power with male fashion, namely the suit and tie. She writes, “If we don’t notice how women are redefining what executive power looks like…it will remain de facto male.”

Bumble is synonymous with a sunny shade of yellow, which marks the company’s mark and is widely featured in Whitney Wolfe Herd publications. Herd uses images that project a “wholesome, girl-next-door” vibe with light lipsticks and muted college-inspired clothing.

The Tinder flame logo is red, and this color dominates images of Renate Nyborg in the news and her own media reports. She usually wears bold red lipstick to match her red outfits, signaling her strength.

When it comes to matching fashion to corporate brands, the meanings associated with certain colors can have unintended consequences for leaders. While yellow can enhance Wolfe Herd’s personality through positive notions of happiness and creativity, associations with red could be interpreted as sexual and aggressive for Nyborg.

Company culture remains male-dominated

Nyborg’s departure from Tinder suggests it’s still difficult for women to retain high-level leadership positions in the tech industry, even when they’re CEOs.

Early reflections from media coverage show continued devaluation of women’s contributions to tech leadership

We need more stories about how women are challenging and changing the male-centric corporate culture.

Treena’s orchard is Associate Professor, School of Health Studies, Western University

Riki Thompson is Associate Professor of Numerical Rhetoric and Writing Studies, University of Washington

This article was first published here.


Read also : Ghosting to ‘backburner’ love, why people misbehave on dating apps


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Powerful women running dating apps are portrayed as young and sexy https://rencontre-latina.com/powerful-women-running-dating-apps-are-portrayed-as-young-and-sexy/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 20:28:15 +0000 https://rencontre-latina.com/powerful-women-running-dating-apps-are-portrayed-as-young-and-sexy/

People are swiping on dating apps in record numbers and about half of those people identify as female, which may be why the dating app industry has recently given top leadership roles to women. .

Indeed, last year the world’s most powerful dating apps – Bumble and Tinder – were both run by women. Whitney Wolfe Herd is at Bumble while Renate Nyborg ran Tinder.

As researchers who write about dating apps like Bumble and dating and feminism, we were interested to see how journalists reported on these two women leading the highly lucrative, internet-dominated online dating industry. men and we wanted to compare this coverage with how CEOs portray themselves on social media.

We looked at the top 50 news from the last year for every woman who appeared in the search results. We found a sexist and condescending cover pattern. We’ve picked up often-repeated descriptors for female leaders and created three categories to describe them: ‘young mogul’, ‘feminist revenge’ and ‘sexy poster’.

We also did a Google Image search and looked at the top 100 results for each CEO to see how a Google search represented those leaders. What we’ve seen are visually distinct styles closely tied to each brand.

In contrast, we observed more diverse and interesting narratives about gender and leadership in women’s personal media spaces. These stories include notions of motherhood, inclusiveness and equity.

There appear to be significant tensions between new representations of women leaders in tech and how they represent themselves.

The Bumble Feeling

Both CEOs are portrayed in the news through the prism of sexism and sensationalism. In the case of Whitney Wolfe Herd, her youth and her scandalous past with Tinder are often highlighted.

Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra, right, with Bumble founder and CEO Whitney Wolfe Herd at the Bumble launch party in New Delhi, India, in 2018.
(AP Photo/Pallav Paliwal)

Wolfe Herd launched feminist dating app Bumble in 2014, after quitting Tinder. She became the youngest self-made billionaire woman. She is also the youngest female CEO to take a company public in the United States.

Yet mainstream media and pop culture outlets focus on her controversial past with Tinder and the sex discrimination lawsuit she filed before quitting Tinder.

The language of competition, division and feminist reaction runs through many of these articles. Bumble is framed as part of its larger feminist agenda which seeks revenge on the tech brothers who dominate the dating app industry.

Renate Nyborg lets go on Tinder

Renate Nyborg’s rise to the top of Tinder in 2021 has been making headlines mostly in financial and business publications. Most stories point to her being Tinder’s first female CEO and being a “poster” for the company since meeting her husband on the app. An article in Fortune the magazine calls it “the ultimate testament to Tinder’s ability to create healthy, long-lasting relationships.”

Other stories reflect optimism about Nyborg’s potential to grow the app due to previous startup experience. Tinder positions itself as the brand, and most stories focus on Nyborg’s ability to drive the business forward.

Yet after less than a year, she was quietly released from her post in August and the impact of her brief reign in the tech industry was glossed over.

During her tenure, Tinder won numerous awards, including Best CEO for Diversity, and she was named one of the Most Innovative Companies of 2022 by fast company.

Given the importance of diversity and innovation in the tech industry, his dismissal is curious whether growth in these areas was a priority for the company. This may be related to the illusory nature of empowerment in various aspects of the dating app industry and Tinder’s lingering identity as a platform associated with hookups and misogyny.

Representations on social networks

Compared to limited and problematic portrayals of CEOs in the media, women are using more diverse and personalized notions of gender and leadership on their social media platforms.

Wolfe Herd showcases his identity as CEO of Bumble on his social media accounts, on Instagram in particular and Twitter less so. She also points to her role as a mother who runs a business that is central to her broader feminist mission.

Her narrative of female empowerment reminiscent of the “boss daughter” is widespread. It is built like the brand, with Bumble and its Philosophy “women take the first step” part of a larger feminist mission to revolutionize modern seduction.

Nyborg curates her leadership persona primarily on professional platforms like Twitter and LinkedIn, and actively posts about leadership, tech blogging, and gender diversity. She also highlights her enthusiasm for running the business.

His social media accounts emphasize a broad framework of inclusivity to effect change. On her last day at Tinder, Nyborg shared a post on LinkedIn to highlight her accomplishments, focusing on improving the safety and inclusion of women at her former company.

fashion and color

Fashion and color are used strategically both in the stories and also in the way these women portray themselves as powerful female executives in important leadership roles.

Journalist Alexis Grenell, writing in The nation, suggests that we have been conditioned to visually associate executive power with male fashion, namely the suit and tie. She writes, “If we don’t notice how women are redefining what executive power looks like…it will remain de facto male.”

Bumble is synonymous with a sunny shade of yellow, which marks the company’s mark and is widely featured in Whitney Wolfe Herd publications. Herd uses imagery that projects a “wholesome, girl-next-door” vibe with light lipsticks and muted college-inspired clothing.

The Tinder flame logo is red, and this color dominates images of Renate Nyborg in the news and her own media reports. She usually wears bold red lipstick to match her red outfits, signaling her strength.

When it comes to matching fashion to corporate brands, the meanings associated with certain colors can have unintended consequences for leaders. While yellow can enhance Wolfe Herd’s personality through positive notions of happiness and creativity, associations with red could be interpreted as sexual and aggressive for Nyborg.

Company culture remains male-dominated

Nyborg’s departure from Tinder suggests it’s still difficult for women to retain high-level leadership positions in the tech industry, even when they’re CEOs.

Early reflections from media coverage show continued devaluation of women’s contributions to tech leadership

We need more stories about how women are challenging and changing the male-centric corporate culture.

]]>
Tinder, Bumble, Happn or Grindr, dating apps are becoming political in Brazil https://rencontre-latina.com/tinder-bumble-happn-or-grindr-dating-apps-are-becoming-political-in-brazil/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://rencontre-latina.com/tinder-bumble-happn-or-grindr-dating-apps-are-becoming-political-in-brazil/


The law of physics that opposites attract isn’t always the case on dating apps like Tinder, Bumble, Happn, and Grindr, and certainly not in Brazil’s highly polarized dating world. Image: Mauro Pimentel / AFP

IIn Brazil, supporting the right presidential candidate can actually get you a date. “Please tell me you’re not leftist, you’re too pretty to be one,” Vivian read in a message she received on the dating app Tinder.

But Vivian supports Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, a leftist who is one of two politicians facing off in the second round of presidential elections on October 30. So no match took place, a sign of how politics has seeped into everyday intimate realms.

Indeed, the law of physics that opposites attract is not always the case on dating apps such as Tinder, Bumble, Happn and Grindr, and certainly not in the highly polarized world of dating in Brazil.

“I’m on the left (and) I’m going to ask you who you vote for. It’s important that we think the same,” warns Gabriela S., a 25-year-old psychologist in Sao Paulo, on her Bumble profile. She asked to keep her last name a secret.

“It makes no sense for me to connect with right-wing people,” said Gabriela, who added that she wouldn’t even drink a beer with someone who has racist views or looks down on the LBGTQ community.

Supporters of President Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right retired military officer who took office in 2019, have carved out their own space on social media to seek romance.

A Facebook group page called Bolsoteiros, a pun that combines “Bolsonaro” with “singles”, has 6,700 members.

“The left stands for everything we disapprove of,” writes Elaine Souza, a 46-year-old social worker, on the page she founded in 2019. But her group’s self-selected supporters “are halfway to finding a partner “.

The election decision facing Brazilians is so divisive that the political filter on dating apps is “the most used by Brazilians,” said Javier Tuiran, Bumble’s communications director in Latin America.

Use of the filter “increased in the months leading up to” the first round of presidential elections on October 2, in which Lula won 48% of the vote and Bolsonaro 43%, Tuiran said.

We can work things out

“I (only accept) those who won’t vote for Bolsonaro… Everyone, we can work things out,” says the 37-year-old Rafael’s Tinder profile.

Sorting out political differences can avoid starting a relationship off on the wrong foot.

Psychologist Ailton Amelio da Silva said that “some differences can be complementary, but they generate incompatibility when they are important, as many people think of politics now” in Brazil.

Jose Mauro Nunes, a doctor of psychology and professor of marketing at the Getulio Vargas Foundation, said polarization in Brazil has inflamed “tribal” identities and created social media bubbles where individuals favor those with similar ideologies.

Read also: Artificial intelligence: users of dating apps are increasingly trusting this matchmaker

Some dating apps see marketing potential by only catering to one side of the political spectrum, like Lefty.

“Finding a mate is hard enough. Not having this (political) incompatibility is a huge help for a lot of people,” said Alex Felipelli, president of Similar Souls, owner of the Lefty app, which has 15,000 users.

Another example is PTinder, an Instagram account with 26,100 followers that “seeks to generate interactions, including singles announcements, between opponents of Bolsonaro,” said its creator, Maria Goretti.

The 38-year-old lawyer said she was inspired by “friends’ fear of meeting someone, then after an incredible night to realize the next morning that (the person) is nostalgic for the dictatorship or has other ideas à la Bolsonaro”.

Goretti said her Instagram account has already led to matings and even marriages.

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Nearly a third of people share their location on dating apps https://rencontre-latina.com/nearly-a-third-of-people-share-their-location-on-dating-apps/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://rencontre-latina.com/nearly-a-third-of-people-share-their-location-on-dating-apps/

Dating apps have seen a surge in users in recent years as people use online platforms to meet potential partners. But often, cybercriminals present themselves as possible matches for nefarious reasons, putting the identity and safety of many online daters at risk.

To uncover the potential consequences of using dating apps, TechRobot analyzed 180 profiles on Bumble, Tinder and Hinge to reveal the amount of information people share on their dating profiles.

  • Online daters share the most information about Bumble (37%) with 55% of profiles sharing where they live.

  • 100% of women share enough information on their dating profiles for their social media accounts to be found, increasing their chances of catfishing attempts.

  • 28% of homosexual profiles share their place of residence compared to only 19% of heterosexual profiles, increasing the risk of blackmail and stalking.

Bumble users share enough information for strangers to get deep insight into their lives online and offline

TechRobot’s study found that people share the most personal information on their Bumble profiles. 98% share photos of themselves and all profiles share their first name and live location and there is no option to hide this information. 90% of all Bumble profiles also share personal interests and hobbies, 55% share where they live, 28% share job titles, and 20% of Bumble profiles also share their Instagram ID. That’s more than enough information for someone to have insight into what online daters are doing throughout their day and where they are, increasing the risk of harassment.

Women share 33% of all possible data points on their dating profiles – more information than their male counterparts

The research also found that women share an average of 33% of possible data points on Tinder, Bumble, and Hinge, compared to 31% for men. Men are more likely to share information about their status, level of education and professional life: 39% of men share their job title, 36% the languages ​​they speak, 19% their employer and 33% their level of education. Women, on the other hand, tend to share information that makes them more physically attractive – 98% share their age, 96% share photos of how they look, and 26% share their Instagram handle. With women sharing more information about their physical appearance, the risk of them posing as catfish is exacerbated, and the information men share about their position and employer means they are more likely to be victims of blackmail attempts. Cybercriminals often offer incentives for monetary gain and use sensitive information such as an individual’s workplace to take advantage of them.

Data point

Percentage of male dating app profiles on Tinder, Bumble, and Hinge that share information on this data point (%)

Percentage of female dating app profiles on Tinder, Bumble, and Hinge that share information on this data point (%)

Age

91

98

Job title

39

37

Spoken languages

36

38

Level of education

33

30

Job/ Company

19

11

Instagram Handle

11

26

Lesbian women share 33% of all possible data points on their dating profiles, most of all sexualities searched

By comparing dating profiles based on sexuality, TechRobot found that gay online daters are more likely to share sensitive information with potential matches than heterosexual users. 28% of gay profiles share where they live compared to only 19% of heterosexual profiles, and 98% of lesbian and gay dating profiles share their appearance, compared to 93% of straight profiles. Lesbian women were also found to share the most information on their profiles of any group studied and they share the most on Bumble – 42% of all possible data points. 44% of lesbian profiles share their place of residence, and 36% their job title. Collectively, this means that lesbian women are providing strangers on dating apps with enormous insight into their personal lives, which could increase their risk of being stalked or even harassed.

Using different photos on social media profiles can reduce the vulnerability of online daters

Users can take steps to protect their privacy and security when dating online. Lasse Walstad recommends using single pictures on dating profiles – “Using reverse image search on Google, people will be able to discover your social accounts and all the other places your photos are posted, giving them a potential access to a large amount of personal information. Using images that you have not used on your other social accounts will reduce the chances that your other accounts, such as Instagram and Facebook, will be less likely to This will reduce the chances of online daters being caught and victimized by stalking crimes.

While the amount of personal information we share on our dating profiles depends on application, gender, and sexual orientation, all profiles expose enough information to offer strangers considerable insight into their lives. This endangers the identity and safety of online daters and exacerbates their chances of falling victim to crimes such as blackmail, stalking, catfishing or stalking.

You can view the full study here.

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Here’s Why I Think Dating Apps Are Exhausting https://rencontre-latina.com/heres-why-i-think-dating-apps-are-exhausting/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 18:40:19 +0000 https://rencontre-latina.com/heres-why-i-think-dating-apps-are-exhausting/

Breakfast Babble: ED’s little space on the interwebs where we meet to discuss ideas and get ready for the day. We also judge things. Sometimes. Still. Either way, call it catharsis and join the people.


Hi how are you? What are you doing? Where are you staying? What are your hobbies? What are you looking for? These mundane questions can sometimes exhaust you mentally. While dating apps have made it easier for you “find a soul mate”, they can also harm your mental health.

Be it Tinder, Bumble, Happn, OkCupid, or anything else, these dating apps are all the same. Swiping, talking, going on dates, then ghosting or ghosting: this cycle continues until you finally give up online dating.

Hours and hours of scrolling, stuck in the act of constant swipes and matches to the right – all dating apps follow the same worn patterns.

Dating apps these days are mostly infested with sexual predators and creepy men, as if the hookup credo has completely taken precedence over people’s urge to create an emotional, platonic connection with someone.

After about two years of confinement, it is likely that people think that online dating is one of the few alternatives to find a soul mate. But after hours of browsing through these dating apps, when you get all the scary texts, it can be disappointing.


Read also : Breakfast Babble: Here’s why I think focusing on the partnership is more important than naming the relationship


I feel exhausted from these dating apps. I’ve installed and uninstalled a few of them multiple times. At some point it starts to feel like a hopeless grind when I get bored with the unnecessarily long chat stages that have no future.

Most users of these apps don’t know what they are looking for. It can get frustrating.

I’ve had my fair share of experience with these dating apps, and it can be fun until it’s not. When you can’t find luck, it starts to drain you mentally. Finding someone organically also has its chances, but since dating apps are meant to help you discover someone you can bond with, it’s more tormenting when you don’t.

Either don’t get caught up in online dating exhaustion, or open these apps with a mindset of not always succeeding. This is how you can keep your mental peace.


Image credits: Google Images

Feature image designed by Saudamini Seth

Sources: Blogger Opinions

Find the blogger: @ekparna_p

This post is tagged under: dating, online dating, dating apps, india dating apps, tinder, bumble, okcupid, truly madly, aisle, intimate relationship, arranged marriages, marriage for love, relationships, online dating sites, casual dating, culture hookup, casual dates, long -term relationships, marriage via dating apps, matchmaking platforms, romance in india, dating during lockdown, romance, depression, mental peace, mental exhaustion, swipes, swipe right, match, chatter, swipe left, reject

Disclaimer: We do not own any rights or copyrights to the images used, these were taken from Google. In case of credit or removal, the owner can send us an email.


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Southern Charm: Shep Rose reveals why he’s on dating apps https://rencontre-latina.com/southern-charm-shep-rose-reveals-why-hes-on-dating-apps/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://rencontre-latina.com/southern-charm-shep-rose-reveals-why-hes-on-dating-apps/

Southern charm‘s Shep Rose is single again, and he literally just talked about his current dating app status. The hot topic came up when he sat down for an interview with BravoTV.com alongside other single Bravolebs on the first day of BravoCon 2022. In conversation with Under the bridge alum Kate Chastain, who moderated the candid chat, Shep was asked, “Do you have your dating app turned on? I feel like it’s a target-rich environment.

” No really not. I only made a dating app a while ago, and I swear I deleted it or thought I deleted it,” he said during the Friday the 14th interview. october. “Apparently I didn’t. I got in trouble for that. And I regret it.”

As it turns out, winter house‘s Ciara Miller actually saw Shep appear on Raya, even though he thought he wasn’t there. “You need to delete your profile,” she told him, to which he replied, “I don’t know how.”

When she reminded him that he was still paying the monthly fee, he enlisted her to help him “get rid of it”.

As fans will recall, Shep and longtime partner Taylor Ann Green confirmed their split in August when she appeared on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen.

Taylor and Shep had been dating for a few years before sharing their relationship even more with viewers on season 8 of Southern charm, which tracked their ups and downs. This season ended on October 13 with the reunion part 2, during which the former couple shared an emotional back and forth about their relationship and went their separate ways.

look Southern Charm on Peacock and the Bravo app.

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